Vignetting: RAW vs jpg

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If you open a RAW file of a shot taken with the Tokina 14-22 mm f/2 in Photoshop or Lightroom, then you will not see any vignetting. Across the whole zoom range, the vignetting in RAW files is about half a stop. If you use a smaller aperture, the vignetting is even more limited. RAW files that are opened outside Lightroom or Photoshop also show no visible vignetting. That is a very good performance for a wide-angle zoom lens.
If you store pictures in the camera in RAW and jpg formats simultaneously, it can be that you see a striking difference between the RAW and jpg file of the same shot:

RAWJPG

Tokina AT-X PRO SD 14-20 mm f/2 (IF) DX:
RAW files even at f/2 almost without vignetting

That does not come from the lens, but from the image editing. The amount of vignetting in jpg files depends on the image editing that is applied by the camera. In the  Tokina 14-20mm f/2 review @ Lenstip , jpg files from the Canon 50D show vignetting of nearly 1 stop and a half stop is only reached after stopping down two stops (f/4). If you save a picture in a Canon 760D simultaneously as a RAW and a jpg file, then the jpg file shows one and a half stops of vignetting at f/2. JPG files that are stored in the Canon 760D even still show 0.75 stops of vignetting at f/5.6. 

Lenscorrections in Lightroom: RAW files only

Ever-more photographers apply automatic lens corrections in Photoshop or Lightroom for vignetting, distortion and chromatic aberration. That can be done batch-wise by applying the correction in 1 shot, and then selecting all the other shots that are made with the same lens and synchronizing the settings of these shots. This is a good reason to shoot in RAW, because in Lightroom and Photoshop are almost no lens correction profiles jpg available.
That the RAW shot shows so much less vignetting than the jpg version is not caused by a lens correction that is done by Photoshop or Lightroom. If you were to apply a lens correction, then the vignetting of the Tokina 14-20 mm f/2 would be even less.

Lenscorrectieprofiel

At the time of this writing, there is not yet a lens correction profile available in Lightroom or Photoshop for the Tokina 14-20 mm f/2. As a temporary solution, you could use the lens profile of the Tokina 11-20 mm f/2.8. After correction, the vignetting is completely invisible, as you can see the example below, where a Canon 760D jpg shot is compared with a corrected RAW file from the same camera, made at 14 mm f/2.

Moreover, not everyone wants to correct for vignetting. In some portraits the edges are darkened using the vignetting correction tool in Lightroom or Photoshop, so that the subject seems more illuminated. Photographers using a camera with a full-frame sensor, are - usually without knowing it - used to 1 to 2 stops vignetting.

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Good Stuff! Awards 2015: best cameras of 2015

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The best cameras and lenses are usually not the least expensive. That is why we publish  "Ivo's choice" with some regularity, for products with an attractive price-to-quality ratio. But at the end of the year, we give out “Good Stuff! Awards” to system cameras and lenses with the highest image quality, regardless of the shop price. “Good Stuff! Awards” are awarded on the basis of the image quality that we have observed in our practice and lab tests. We thus do not give any Awards to products that we have not reviewed ourselves.

Image quality should not be the only criterion on which you base the choice of a camera. We are now—as we speak—busy behind the screens, working on expanding of the scores with the versatility and user-friendliness of cameras, in the hope of having the project completed before New Year’s.

Because there are many different types of photographers, with different preferences, we have divided the cameras into a few categories. For the “Good Stuff! Awards,” it does not matter to use what year a camera or lens appeared. To the contrary, since the price-to-quality ratio of older products is usually better. With equivalent image quality, we choose the older model. So as not to tease you with pink unicorns, we only give “Good Stuff! Awards” to cameras that are still for sale.

290GS award2015
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Sport fishing with a telephoto lens

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Men love hunting. Give a dentist a gun, and he will happily take down the most popular lion in Africa. A dock worker with a carbon fiber rod and a tent goes hunting carp in the middle of the night. Give a photographer a telephoto lens, and he goes on safari. You get the picture, I think. For variety, or if you are bored with that, you can crank up the difficulty level by switching to sport fishing with a telephoto lens. Bring the world under the water into frame based on what the obliging birds turn up for you. They are happy to help out. Like the cat who lovingly takes the neighbor’s parakeet home with him, kingfishers, egrets, and grebes bring the Dutch underwater fauna to you. We collected a few important nature photography tips for you. 

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Panasonic GH4 firmware 2.3 & V log L

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Yesterday, the Panasonic Firmware Update 2.3 for Panasonic GH4 has been released. This makes it possible to install Panasonic's (paid) V-Log L. I have gone through the installation process and yesterday shot som footage with the Panasonic GH4 +  Kipon AF adapter + Sigma AF 150-600mm Contemporary. For good color rendition, Panasonic also provides a corresponding Look Up Table, which you need to install in your video editing software. Without LUT , you can also edit the V-Log L footage, but thanks to the LUT color grading runs with one press of a button. Panasonic claims that you achieved through the V-log L a dynamic range of 14 stops. Last night there was a lot of light, so videos without Vlog irrevocably faded highlights and highlights with far too saturated yellows would have produced. Thanks to the V-log L and the corresponding LUT you do not have problems anymore.  The processed images look very good. The increase in image quality, makes the investment of 100 euro worth. Here a preview.

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Surpising: Results of the focal distance poll

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We are accustomed to shots from an inexpensive telephoto lens having a lower contrast and being less sharp. If you want to make sharp, contrast-rich telephoto shots on a camera with a full-frame sensor, then the longest bright telephoto lenses cost many thousands of euros. They are heavy, and the longest focal distance remains—even if you use an extra teleconverter—limited to less than 1200mm. 

Videographers are accustomed to using smaller sensors and thus pulling their subject in closer. By filming in 4K video, you can do that as well: with 30 shots per second of 8 megapixels. It is thus also possible for amateur photographers to pull in subjects with a relatively short focal distance. You choose between video (preferably with a shutter time of 1/50 of a second, since at a faster shutter time the image becomes jerky) and 4K Photo (preferably with the fastest shutter time possible).

How would the image quality from these extreme telephoto lens shots be? I took the acid test and put this video on the site, with the question of what focal distance, converted to a full-format sensor, this shot was made with.

2 of the 50 readers got it right

A full 94% of the 50 readers who responded thought it was a focal distance of 300 mm or 500 mm (converted to full frame). Two of the 50 respondents were correct. Video recordings for nature films are frequently made with a focal distance of 1000 mm (FF equivalent). The video of the magpie was made with a lens with a 400 mm focal distance on a Panasonic GH4. It gives you—if you film in Ultra-HD/4K—a field of view of 1° 14'. That corresponds with the field of view of a 2000mm lens on a camera with a full format sensor. I was also pleasantly surprised by the high image quality and took a couple of pictures with a similar set-up. I think that there is even more room for improvement by choosing a modern telephoto lens (I expect a great deal of the Olympus 4300mm f/4, with or without a teleconverter), since all the shots on this page are made with an Olympus 50-200mm zoom lens plus a 2x converter.

Practically everyone thought it was a much shorter focal distance

Filming with an extreme telephoto lens means that you are forced to work from a sturdy tripod. Even then, a tiny bit of wind can have a significant impact on the image. For the shot of the swan, I had to stabilize the image in Adobe Premiere Pro. For 4K Photo, this is a bit less important, since if you choose a fast shutter speed, then there will always be a good picture in there, despite the movements that you make with the lens.

The shot above is also made with a 400 mm focal distance on a Panasonic GH4 (Olympus 50-20 mm zoom with 2x converter). I hope in the coming weeks to be able to experiment a bit with even longer focal distances.

Panasonic G7 4K Photo

The video below begins with a 100% partial enlargement of a video that was made with the Panasonic G7 (our G7 review appears very soon) in the 4K Photo mode. For the video, I wanted to keep some of the bokeh, and I cropped it a bit less, so that the kingfisher in the video is a bit smaller.

 

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AF Review: 7D MK2 vs NX1 vs GH4

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Action photography was the exclusive domain of the SLR.

Action photography, a bit over a year ago, meant that you used an SLR on continuous AF and burst mode. And then took shots at around 5 images per second. When I took pictures for CameraStuffReview with an SLR camera (or a Nikon 1) of a speeding car that was coming right at me, then with a series I got primarily sharp—and a few less sharp—shots. Phase detection of an SLR camera, since the appearance of the Minolta 7000 in 1985, has grown into a lightning-fast system.

01AFtest
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Site tip: Photo against photo

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Many photographers would like to compare the image quality of a camera or lens with another themselves, on the basis of practice shots. If you're part of this group, then visit Photo against Photo, which is fully focused on the comparison of cameras and lenses. It's a great supplement to the Comparometer from Image Resource and the Dpreview studio scene, where you can compare studio shots with each other. There are already nearly 4000 test shots on Photo against Photo, which you can compare directly at 100%. All the shots from Photo against Photo can also be downloaded. Photo against Photo, compare practice shots!

Photo against photo, praktijkopnames vergelijken
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What if...

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Photography revolves around creativity. A beautiful image comes to your head. Then you get the chance to give it form. You don't have to go to an exotic destination for that. For ideas, you don't even have to go further than your smartphone, laptop or Mac.
Viktorija Pashuta mmade two series of fashion photos based on the logos of social media (with just male models): What if guys were social networks and internet browsers (just female models): What if girls were internet browsers?
pashutaphotography
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Dynamic range most important sensor property

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We review various properties of cameras, which together with the photographer and the lens determine the image quality. The quality of all modern cameras is good. The differences in image quality between cameras—if we're talking about cameras with a micro-43, APS-C/DX or full-frame/FX sensor—are in many cases small, but certainly under extreme circumstances visible.

In the total score for image quality of cameras, the various properties are weighted to come to a final score. Because we were curious about which camera properties you all think are the most important, we asked you about it.

histogram-2 
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Lightroom tip: open several libraries

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Lightroom is a great program for managing large numbers of photos. Experienced Lightroom users with hundreds of thousands of images, such as professional photographers, save their Lightroom data into multiple Lightroom libraries. So I have the test images for CameraStuffReview stored in separate libraries for each year. One of the few disadvantages of Lightroom is that you can not open multiple libraries simultaneously.
A detour can!

LR1
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Bokeh or image stabilization?

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A few years ago, image stabilization was unique, something you only found in expensive telephoto lenses. Today, we can't do without it.

Any kit lens you get for 100 euro/buy when you buy a new camera, has built-in image stabilization. With telephoto lenses and telephotot zooms, although at an additional cost, it's generally included. With standard zooms and wide-angle zooms you can choose. Canon offers EF zoom lenses (24-70 mm and 16-35 mm) in a bright f/2.8 version without image stabilization and in a less expensive f/4 version with built-in image stabilization.

Would you choose a brighter Canon EF-S 10-22 mm without IS, or the less expensive Canon EF-S 10-18 mm with IS? Curious about your opinion, we held a readers' survey.

ImageStabilizer
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View Tip: 25 Photo Clichés You Should Stop Doing

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Lists with 10 tips – the subject doesn't matter – are popular on the internet. Even stronger: Ten tips lists are hot.

What do you do as a website to distinguish yourself from the rest?
You make a list with 25 tips. Twenty-five tips is the future!

At least Web 4.0.

The people from DigitalRev have grasped that very well. Their video, "25 Photo Clichés You Should Stop Doing," hits the nail on the head. And it gives 99% of the viewers a kick in the butt. Me too.

DigitalRev
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Canon EF 70-200mm f/4 L IS Lens Meets Big Bad Brown Bear

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"Brown bear?" I hear you thinking. "This is a black bear?" Rest assured, the brown bear is coming. I saw Canon EF 200-400mm L IS Lens Meets Big Bad Black Bear by Bryan Carnathan from TThe Digital Picture. Bryan describes on the basis of a very nice shot he made, how to recognize and photograph a black bear. I have also tested the Canon 200-400 mm IS L lens and find it is indeed a great lens to have with you if you encounter a bear. If not to take pictures, then this lens solid enough to chase the bear away from you, without significant damage to the lens. Unfortunately, I cannot afford such solid equipment—but a Canon 70-200 mm f/4 IS L.

Hence the title.

minibeer



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