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Review Nikon D850

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s2smodern

The Nikon D850 is more than just a top model from Nikon. Ease of use, build quality and image quality are absolute tops. This is a camera with so many features and options that it may be the only camera you need.

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Review Nikon D5600: ALWAYS CONNECTED

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s2smodern

The Nikon D5600 is a new SLR camera from Nikon with an APS-C ("DX") sensor. The camera looks like a twin of the Nikon D5500 and shares nearly all that camera’s technology. What’s new on the D5600 is SnapBridge. That ensures that the camera can easily connect and stay connected with smartphones and tablets. You can thus share pictures easily.

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s2smodern

Review Nikon D3400

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s2smodern

The Nikon D3400 is the newest starter model from Nikon. The body and the sensor are practically unchanged relative to its predecessor, the Nikon D3300, which we reviewed previously. You could say that it is a D3300 with one big and a number of small changes. The big advance is that the D3400 has SnapBridge, with which you can automatically transfer files to your smartphone—with much lower power consumption than with WiFi—so that you can then share them from the smartphone on social media. But the sensor can no longer clean itself, and the flash is less powerful. One step forwards and two steps back? Or does the D3400 still really represent progress?

D3400Consumertype

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Review Nikon D500: lightning-fast Nikon surprise

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s2smodern

The Nikon D500 is the newest APS-C/DX-format digital SLR camera from Nikon. Nikon's DX flagship was unexpectedly announced at the beginning of 2016 and has been available since April in the Netherlands. The target group for this successor of the Nikon D300 is the pro/semi-pro action or nature photographer. The body with a 21 mp sensor is namely super-fast, both as far as the auto focus is concerned and as far as the number of frames per second concerns. In addition, the Nikon D500 is equipped with an enormous buffer, with which you can shoot an uninterrupted series of hundreds of RAW + jpg shots. It might be that everything you would want is on it. And the construction is very solid. We tested the camera with a number of different Nikon lenses and were impressed. Why?

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Review Nikon D5: 3 million ISO

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s2smodern

Since March 2016, the Nikon D5 has been for sale for an impressive list price of €7109.-. Nikon’s new top model is intended for photographers and filmmakers who work under extreme conditions: built like a tank, 12 images (incl. AF) per second in an uninterrupted series of hundreds of RAW + JPG shots. A battery that just doesn’t die. And 4K video.

"However far your vision reaches,
Nikon D5 always goes one step further."

The new flagship of Nikon has a 20.7 megapixel FX sensor and can take pictures at extremely low ISO values (100,000 ISO, expandable to 3 million). The Nikon D5 distinguishes itself with a more sensitive AF module (down to -4 EV) and light meter (down to -3EV) than the Canon 1Dx II (-3 EV for AF and 0 EV for the exposure meter). Thanks to the sensitive light meter and AF module of the Nikon D5, you can photograph what you can no longer see with the naked eye. That is very unusual. Does low-light change into no-light photography with 3 million ISO?

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s2smodern

Review Nikon 1 J5 - new sensor, much better

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s2smodern

The Nikon J5 is the latest model from the "middle" of the Nikon 1 series. The model differs from its predecessor (J4) by a different design, a folding touchscreen and especially with a new sensor. A back side illuminated (BSI) sensor, in which the wiring lies behind the pixels instead of on top of it, has, according to the factory, better resolution and a higher dynamic range. We tested the Nikon 1 J5 with the 10-30 VR kit lens, and—because of the resolution—with a fixed focal point: Nikon 1 18.5 mm f/1.8. Does Nikon fulfill the J5's claims? Do they ever!

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Review Nikon D5500

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Nikon SLR with rotating touchscreen

The Nikon D5500 is the new APS-C SLR for amateur photographers from Nikon, with a 24-megapixel sensor. There is a whole new body, smaller and especially lighter than that of its predecessor. The camera is richly outfitted with setting options and has a beautiful LCD screen that can flip up and turn and now also functions as a touchscreen.

The Nikon D5500 is even smaller than its predecessor, the D5300. Certainly when the body is fitted with a compact lens like the collapsible Nikon 18-55 mm VR II, it fits in a bag, and perhaps even in a large jacket pocket. It is a real all-around family camera, with various scene and effect modes, but it is simultaneously suited for serious photography. There is a built-in flash, a shutter down to 1/4000 of a second and an ISO range up to 25,600. We tested this camera with various lenses, and for the practice shots, we made use of a 50 mm f/1.4 lens.

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A sunny shot in a Swiss resort, made at 1/320 second at f/7.1, 100 ISO.

Nikon D5500 versus D5300 and the D7200

The Nikon D5500 replaces the Nikon D5300. In doing so, practically all the specifications are retained; only the GPS was dumped. With the Nikon GP-1A GPS unit, it is always possible to provide this camera with GPS. The ISO range of the Nikon D5500 is 1 stop larger than that of its predecessor. There are more options and functions available in the Nikon D5500 for editing images—extra filters for example. The most noticeable difference is the more compact and especially lighter housing: the Nikon D5500 is 6 mm flatter and weights just 420 grams. That is possible due to the use of a new, fiber-enhanced plastic that is supposed to provide the required stiffness. Despite the mini format, the camera fits nicely in the hand, partly thanks to a forward-protruding grip for the right hand. The LCD screen has grown to 3.2 inches; it flips up, and it turns, and you can use it as a touchscreen for setting things like exposure, ISO, white balance and picture control. There is limited WiFi connectivity, so the shutter can be operated remotely by some smartphones. The video options are expanded with 1080 60p.

At about the same time as this Nikon D5500, we tested Nikon's D7200. That is really a whole other camera: it also has a 24-megapixel sensor, but it is larger and heavier, and better sealed against splashwater and dust. It is equipped with more setting options, but it is also significantly more expensive. We assume that the D5500 will be the first or second SLR for many buyers, while the clientele for the D7200 most probably consists of people who already have the requisite photography experience.

Nikon D5500 versus Canon 750D/760D

In terms of price, the D5500 about corresponds with the Canon 760D. (be sure that the manufacturers and importers keep an eye on each other!) Also in terms of specs, the similarities are great. The same number of megapixels, the same shutter time range. The Canon has 1 ISO stop less, and fewer AF fields. They both have a built-in WiFi and a tilting display. The 760D has a second LCD screen on top of the body, on which you can control the settings. With the Nikon D5500 and the Canon 750D, that is done via the normal screen. The Canon is a good bit heavier: 560 g versus 420. You feel that difference! On the basis of the specifications, we would strongly prefer the Nikon or the Canon. We attach more value to the actual performance in our test.
With no fewer than 6000 pixels on the longer side, you naturally have outstanding resolution! This shot was made with 1/400 at f/8, ISO 100. The text on the advertisement next to the houses can be read without difficulty: "The 1930s translated to now."
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Build quality and design of the Nikon D5500

We already mentioned the design of the Nikon D5500. Note the deep handgrip (picture on the right; there is also a red version) that makes holding the camera easy, despite the small size. The body is made from fiber-strengthened plastic and is thus very light. Everything looks good, but the weather resistance is less than that of the Nikon D7200. The Nikon D5500 is—just like nearly all other amateur cameras—not a camera for extremely heavy weather. The battery is the EN-EL 14, according to Nikon good for 800 shots, and in our test for more than 500, more than sufficient for amateur use.

 

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Viewfinder and Operation

Because the camera housing of the Nikon D5500 is so small, the designers struggled with space. The control buttons are thus distributed across the front, top and back. There is no separate button for ISO or AF. There is only one setting disc and the familiar four-way switch. You can use the Fn button for that. It is all small-detail work in comparison with the D7200 or the D750, the miniature push button for the shutter (auto release, continuous mode) in particular is difficult to find. Many functions work via the menu, but it is much handier to press the i-button on the back, after which you see the most-used settings on the screen, and you can operate these by touch.

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The screen itself is fine; there is an eye sensor, with which it turns off by itself when you use the viewfinder. Unless you need to photograph from difficult angles (on the ground, for example), we always advise against the use of an LCD screen as a viewfinder. It hurts us when we see how some SLR owners hold the camera out in front of them as though it were a telephone! The image through an optical viewfinder is, after all, so much more beautiful and complete. There is also a good bit of picture information shown in the viewfinder, but its brightness leaves something to be desired as far as we're concerned. Outdoors, it is difficult to see.

Auto focus

 

Focusing can be done in the "normal" way via phase detection and via LiveView. Switching quickly between AF-S and AF-C and the different field modes requires intervention via the quick menu; there is no separate button for it. There is a maximum of 39 focal points. The phase detection AF is reasonably fast, in our standard test about half a second. It also works in very low light. In LiveView, it takes a good bit longer: more than a second and a half. That is slow when you're waiting.

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The continuous mode

 
The Nikon D5500 naturally has a continuous mode. The maximum speed in JPEG is 5.2 fps. We think that the buffer is at least as important, that is to say the maximum number of shots that you can make in a row. In JPEG large/fine, we measured 13 shots, which is a series of 2.5 seconds—more than enough. In RAW, however, we couldn't do more than 6 shots in 1.3 seconds. That is on the very lean side. For active work, RAW must thus be avoided. meisjes2 web klein

Menu and special features 

Nikon menus are traditionally very long, and you have to scroll through them vertically. Some settings are done via the Personal Settings menu. That has to be searched for every time. A number of options that we know from the more expensive Nikon models are missing. So there is no AF fine-tuning. The auto release has to be activated for every shot, which is also not handy. There are no fewer than 26 scene pre-settings by which exposure, ISO, AF field settings and flash will be adjusted to the subject. With the Effects setting, you can change pictures that have already been taken.

There is built-in WiFi with which you can upload and with which you can operate the camera remotely with some smartphones. It does not work for all brands and types, and the setting options are limited.

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High resolution

Shot at 1/80 of a second, f/13, ISO 400. The tree trunk is laying on the ground, and that requires LiveView with the LCD screen folded out. Focus for these kinds of nearby shots is always very critical, but that worked perfectly here.

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Pixels in excess with this camera! 6000x4000, each pixel measuring 0.004 mm! Who would have thought five years ago that such numbers, at that time reserved to expensive mid-size cameras, would be possible for consumer cameras? The D5500 no longer has an anti-alias filter; with this number of pixels, that no longer contributes anything. In theory, you can make a perfect poster at A1 size with a perfectly executed D5500 shot. Then all the conditions do have to be fulfilled: no motion blur (still the most important reason for quality loss) and a good lens set to an aperture in the mid-range, say between f/4 and f/8. At larger apertures, lens errors are often visible, and at smaller apertures, the resolution unavoidably falls due to the physics phenomenon of diffraction.

The resolution of the D5500 is very good, and it gives nothing up to that of the more expensive D7200—not entirely illogical since they have the same sensor. Even at high ISOs, the camera performs very well.

With so many pixels, focusing is extremely critical. At 50 mm f/1.4 at full aperture on the D5500, we took pictures at an angle of 45 degrees of the editors' bookcase, looking for deviations in focus—the front-focus/back-focus effect. The photo below shows a series of shots, from left to right with apertures 1.4, 2.0, 2.8, 4.0 and 5.6. We focused on the number 10 on the measuring stick. At full aperture, that is precisely the focal point, as it should be. With stopping down, the focal point appeared to shift backwards, as much as 3 cm at f/4. This is a lens phenomenon, not a body phenomenon, which is common. With further stopping down, the focal depth increases so greatly that the focal point no longer matters. The D5500 has no option for AF fine tuning, but this would not help either, because the camera always focuses correctly at full aperture.

What we want to say with this is certainly not intended as a disqualification of the body or the lens. It serves as an illustration of the fact that the pixel number of bodies like this one makes the slightest deviation visible. We use a prime lens here with approximately the highest brightness available. With the use of less bright zooms and consumer lenses, you will never notice it.

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Another sunny picture at 1/2500 of a second at f/8.

Dynamic range

 

The dynamic range is the property of rendering both very light and very dark parts of the picture. You can see it in the histogram, which you can call up on the Nikon D5500 with a couple of clicks of the four-way switch: if the range is too small, then you see peaks on the right and left that indicate clipped parts. In our laboratory test, the camera, like earlier Nikon cameras, performed well. With the D-light setting, the exposure curve is a bit stretched out on both sides, but without any improvement to the dynamic range. We noticed that the camera automatically engages the D-light option for all Scene settings.

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100isodynamicrange

Video

The Nikon D5500 can film in full HD, 1080 60p, that is to say, at 60 frames per second. In order to film, you flip the LiveView lever that is next to the settings disc. You do not have to choose between photographing and filming (like you do with the more expensive Nikon models). There is a separate start-stop button for filming. Very handy. The image quality of Nikon video recordings has increased over the years. They are beautiful, clean images with a low signal-to-noise ratio and a beautifully neutral color reproduction.

Conclusion 

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Amateur
Year:2015
Overall score:8.3
Resolution:7.5
Dynamic Range:8.2
Noise:8.5
Color:7.8
Whitebalance:6.5
Megapixels:24
Sensor:APSC
Sensor magn.:0.55
fps:5
Weight (gram):420
MSRP NL (Euro):819

 

Pros

  • High image quality
  • Compact and feather-light
  • Lots of options
  • Part of a large system; many lenses and accessories available
  • Good price-to-quality ratio

Cons

  • No GPS
  • No extra protection against dust and water
  • AF in LiveView is slow
The Nikon D5500 is an extraordinarily handy camera with lots of options and perfect image quality. In comparison with the D5300, the increase in image quality is modest, but the ease of use—due to the fold-out screen that can now also be used as a touchscreen—is significantly increased. Many people will find that handy. Practically all the features that you could want as an amateur photographer are on it. The number of pixels is enormous for an APS-C sensor; the resolution and the dynamic range are high. If you want to get everything out of this camera, then invest in a high-quality lens as well. The Nikon D5500 is not really a starter model—that is the less expensive Nikon D3300—but the price-to-quality ratio of the Nikon D5500 is good.
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Review Nikon D7200

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s2smodern

D7200: for pro(-sumer) & ambitious amateurs

The Nikon D7200 is the newest top-end APS-C camera from Nikon, with a new 24 megapixel sensor without low-pass filter, a larger buffer for series shots and built-in WiFi (NFC). Externally, the D7200 strongly resembles the D7100. It's a camera built like a brick, well-sealed against the elements and simply suited for heavy semi-professional use. Everything you want is on it, perhaps with the only exception being built-in GPS.

D7200front

 APS-C (DX) or go to Full-Frame (FX)?

Do I choose a camera with an APS-C (in Nikon terminology: DX) sensor or a more expensive, larger and heavier camera with a one-and-a-half-times-larger full-frame (FX) sensor? Many photographers wrestle with that question. Full-frame equipment is in general more solid, bigger and heavier. That applies both to the bodies and to the lenses. It is also significantly more expensive! For a body plus 2-3 lenses, count on paying two to three times as many euros. Full-frame has more pixels, and those pixels are also larger, so that the image quality and the noise performance is in general better, and the ISO range is larger. For DX, there are fewer wide-angle lenses available than for FX, and no ultra-wide angles at all with a fixed focal length. FX lenses do fit on DX bodies, but not the other way around. And you get a 1.5x telephoto effect for free, which is really great for nature photography. Because with an FX lens on a DX body, you do not use the corners, you eliminate edge flaws. A moderate FX lens can become a good DX lens this way. Don't expect that you can use such a lens if you later switch to FX, since then the results will be disappointing.

DX bodies have, in our opinion, improved relatively more in the past years than FX bodies, so that the performance of the two systems have become more similar. Those who seldom or never print shots at A2 or larger can work very well with a top-end DX body like this Nikon D7200. In that case, do buy good lenses as well!

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Shot with 1/2000 at f/11. Due to the high frame rate, the D7200 is outstandingly suited for this kind of photography.

 

D7200 vs D7100: a bit faster and more shots

The D7200, as we wrote in the introduction, does not differ at all in appearance and internally on parts from the D7100. The number of pixels of the D7200 is no different than that of the D7100 (6000 x 4000). Even so, the sensor is different; as they say, the D7200 has a Sony sensor, and the D7100 has a Toshiba sensor. Nikon does not confirm that, and in order to be sure, you would have to destroy the camera. The D7200 has no low-pass/anti-alias filter anymore. We witnessed years ago that such a thing is really unnecessary with the large numbers of pixels used today. In theory, you could have trouble with moiré effects, but in practice shots, that seldom occurs. Both Nikons include Capture NX software for free, and Lightroom or Photoshop can simply handle any moiré, if that should be needed.

The most important update is perhaps the built-in WiFi and NFC connection with which you can make a connection with a smartphone.

D7200zijkant

You can operate the body remotely (within certain limits). Furthermore, the internal storage buffer is larger. The D7200 is 20% faster than the D7100 (6.2 frames per second in JPEG, 5.3 in 14-bit RAW), but due to the larger buffer, you can now shoot 25 JPEGs large/fine in succession, and 11 RAWs. That is a significant improvement, since series shots in the continuous setting of less than one second (as with the D7100) are often rather pointless. The processing of a full butter also takes time: more than a minute and a half was not unusual.

In our tests, we got the following results for images per second and number of shots to a full buffer:

  • JPEG basic 6.2 fps, 59 shots
  • JPEG Large/Fine 6.2 fps, 25 shots
  • 14-bit RAW (NEF) 5.3 fps, 11 shots
  • 12-bit RAW (NEF) 4800x3200 pixels, 6.1 fps, 16 shots
  • D7100 14 bits RAW: 6 fps, 6 shots

Nikon D7200 versus Canon 70D

 zwaan web

Nikon D7200 with Nikon 18-105 mm lens @ 18 mm, 1/2000 seconds at f/8

In terms of specifications, the Canon 70D comes very close to the D7200. It is just as fast and has the same size buffer; it also has WiFi and full-HD video, and nearly the same ISO range. The 70D has just one card slot and fewer pixels (20 MP), but has a tilting LCD screen. For Live-View photography, that's a big advantage, especially because the field of view of such a screen is rather limited. That screen on the Canon is also a touchscreen. Modern users love that, since they are not used to anything else with their smartphones. Canon also has a hybrid, "dual-pixel" focusing system, with which focusing is done during filming on the basis of "left-looking" and "right-looking" pixels.

Build and operation

The Nikon D7200 has a very solid body in which there is a great deal of light metal used. It has a fixed, not rotating or tilting, 3" LCD screen. It is (still) the only APS-C camera from Nikon with a focus motor in the body, you can also use older lenses without AF-S. The electrical connections (and there are quite a few) are tidily concealed behind rubber covers. There are two SD card slots. The operation is done with two settings discs. We do not find Nikon menus to be super-handy; you have to scroll too much. The camera has buttons on the front, the top and the back. The rotating knob on the top of the body is secured against unintended turning. If you want to choose another setting, then you have to simultaneously turn the safeguard and the knob. That is not always really handy.
Of course there is Live-View; you choose photo or film with a switch. For filming, there is a separate release button. There is a connection for an optional external grip with extra batteries, but the built-in EN-EL 15 battery pack, which is also used in the D800, has enormous capacity. According to the specifications, it's good for more than 1000 shots in the D7200. That seems to us to be enough! The camera has a built-in flash. You can use it as a 'regular' flash; the shortest synchronization is 1/250 of a second, but you can also use it to drive external flashes via the Nikon CVS system.

Further, everything you could want in terms of options and possibilities is on it, and we are not going to discuss them all. Only built-in GPS is missing. According to Nikon, it is often requested but seldom used.

 

Perfect image quality

The Nikon D7200 is equipped with a 24 megapixel APS-C / DX sensor without moiré filter, which delivers a performance that comes very close to that of the Nikon D5300 and D7100, which are also equipped with a 24 megapixel sensor. Where image quality is concerned, it's a neck-and-neck race. They are all three state of the art.

Auto focus

One difference between the Nikon D7200 and its predecessor is a somewhat improved auto focus module; the improvement is in the light sensitivity. Where the 7100 could focus at a light value of -2, the D7200 does that at -3 LW. In order to put this in the right perspective: that corresponds with a shutter time of 1/80 of a second at f/1.4 and ISO 25,600. Then you really can't see your hand in front of your face. The camera is more sensitive than the human eye.

The auto focus is not only light sensitive, it is also fast: with AF-S lenses, you really don't notice that you're focusing. There is a whole arsenal of AF options. For photographers of a bike race, we used the 3D setting; the camera then follows, on the basis of color information, the subject on which you initially focus. The shot shown here is from a series of 15, whereby the camera kept following the green helmet of one of the racers, who covered more than 25 meters between the first and the last shot.

For the techno-freaks: the camera has a fine setting with which you, by lens, can correct for possible front-focus/back-focus problems.

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ISO and noise

The ISO range of this camera runs up to 25,600; those are real ISOs, not high settings. The noise is then still quite acceptable, even without engaging noise reduction (see the shot shown here). Above that, there are 2 high settings, but those produce exclusively black-and-white pictures! Given that shots in the high settings are typically useless due to the color noise and color shift (both for Nikon and for other brands), we don't think this is such a terrible choice. The noise performance of the D7200 is a bit better than that of the D7100.

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Resolution and dynamic range

 

The resolution of the D7200 sensor is, as long as it's provided with a high-quality lens, very good. We used both the Nikon 18-105 mm and the Nikon 55-200 mm zooms in the practice test. The first gave the best-looking results. For the Nikon D7200, a Nikon 70-200 mm f/4 or a Nikon 80-400 mm seem to use to be better choices than the Nikon 55-200 mm.

The dynamic range (the rendering of the black and white parts in a contrast-rich subject) might be the same. The photos shown above of the peloton in that bike race I mentioned give an indication. There is hard back lighting and nonetheless, the histogram shows only very light clipping of the highlights: the sunlight reflected on the cyclist's helmet. The D-light option, which in the jpg file could have delivered some improvement, was switched off. The shot shown here (white house, bright son) also shows well-rendered highlights. Our Imatest measurement for the dynamic range of the D7200 came out a bit higher than that of the D5300 or the D7100. DxO Mark saw the same trend. In practice, all three did very well.

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Even more versatile, now with NFC

Everything that you need is on it. Perhaps the only exception is built-in GPS, which Nikon—probably in order to maximize the battery life as much as possible—has omitted. NFC (Near Field Communication) offers the ability to transfer files to your smartphone without fussing with passwords. That's particularly practical if you want to share a great picture that you just took with a friend or family member by sending the shot to their smartphone.

HDR

Next to the D-light options that are slowly becoming accustomed to, and by which the histogram is stretched out a bit on the light and dark side without actually increasing the dynamic range, the D7200 also has a real HDR option, with which two shots are made in quick succession and then combined with software. We are thus really talking about two individual shots—you hear the shutter click twice, but the mirror does not return in between. You can set the "strength" of the HDR processing yourself. The maximum setting gives the greatest effect, but at the same time, it also sometimes produces ugly halos. Compare the photo of the flower below without (left) and with (right) HDR high. A more modest HDR setting would have been better.  tuin web HDR klein
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No built-in Panorama mode

pano brouwersdam web

The D7200 has no built-in panorama mode; that is, given the target audience for this camera, not an illogical choice. On the other hand, cameras offer ever-more options for processing the image in-camera or applying an Art filter, so that it can then be immediately shared via social media.
This shot of the Brouwersdam between Schouwen and Goeree was made by stitching together seven shots in Photoshop. In order to get a usable length-to-breadth ratio, we always make these kinds of shots in the portrait mode. All the shots are evenly exposed (so on M), otherwise you will always see the transitions. 1/800 at f/8. On the right, a boat of the Coast Guard, the same location, with the kit zoom in the telephoto setting (200 mm).
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 Filming

Of course, the Nikon D7200 can also film. Before filming, the live-image switch has to be pressed and set to film. Then focus by half-pressing the shutter button. Then there is a separate start/stop button for film. Making photos while filming is possible, but then the filming stops.
The Nikon D7200 has the same video functions as Nikon's professional cameras with a full-frame sensor. You make Full HD video (1920 x 1080) with a speed up to 25 images per second (25p/30p). When you switch to the 1.3x excerpt, you can advance the recording speed to Full HD at 50 frames per second (50p/60p).
Experience videographers will be happy with the Picture Control setting "Flat" because it creates the space to play so that you can optimize the sharpening, exposure and color gradations in post-editing.

In a special film menu, you can save all the film settings in one place. Film recordings will be saved on the two SD memory cards or simultaneously exported via HDMI to an external recorder or monitor.
For fluid transitions between dark and bright situations, you can make recordings with auto-ISO sensitivity in the M mode. With the Show highlights mode, you can see exactly where the highlights are clipped.
There is a built in stereo microphone with audio regulation so that you can select the sound range (broad/speech) or reduce wind noise when recording with the built-in microphone. There is also a connection for an external microphone.

Picture Control: Standard Picture Control: Flat
DSC 0945Histogrammini DSC 0946HistoMini
If you photograph in RAW, then you have enough room left to play in order to correct any over-exposure or under-exposure, to adjust the white balance or to optimize the sharpness. You do not have that room to play with video. Experienced videographers therefore swear by an image style where the shadows are made lighter during recording, so that under-exposure can be prevented as much as possible. In addition, the highlights will be dampened in order to prevent over-exposure. Every brand has an image style with its own name for this. On the Nikon D7200, you can use the Flat Picture Control.
In particular in situations where the subject has very high contrast, or for shooting in the dark, this new image style offers advantages. Our first experiences with this are positive. The shots above are stills from Full-HD video recordings: on the left an unedited video recording with standard picture style, where over-saturation of the red tree and over-exposure of the green grass are clearly visible. This quality loss cannot be repaired afterwards. On the right, a shot made with the Flat Picture Control. Not only do the red and green show up better, but the general sharpness is also nicer.

 

Review conclusion

The Nikon D7200 is the DX top model and really a fantastic camera about which there is little to criticize. Few bodies score as high in terms of image quality. And those are often full-frame cameras. Build quality, ease of use and versatility also make this a full-value top model of the Nikon DX series. 

D7200video

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Prosumer
Year:2015
Overall score:8.3
Resolution:7.5
Dynamic Range:8.4
Noise:8.5
Color:7.3
Whitebalance:7.0
Megapixels:24
Sensor:APSC
Sensor magn.:0.63
fps:6
Weight (gram):675
MSRP NL (Euro):1199

 

Pros

  • Very good resolution, little noise and extremely high dynamic range
  • Solidly built, beautifully finished
  • Very complete in terms of execution and options (NFC)
  • Fast continuous mode, a large buffer, long series are possible
  • High-quality video
  • More user-friendly for video in comparison with its predecessors

Cons

  • No folding screen
  • Not inexpensive, but it is worth the money
  • No GPS

Nikon is a brand that puts the emphasis on photography. At the same time, the user-friendliness and the image quality of the Nikon D7200 are so high that they can be given a bit more publicity. The photographer who occasionally makes a high-quality video recording does not need to carry around an additional video camera and will do really well with this camera.
The Nikon D7200 is not inexpensive, bit it's worth it's price, on the basis of the solidity and the complete design. We stick with our usual recommendation: invest in quality lenses as well, preferably with vibration reduction. The lenses that are typically part of a combo package (kit) are good, but with a more specialized and/or brighter lens, the Nikon D7200 comes even more into its own.

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Review Nikon D750

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How could you add an even more attractive FX camera to the already broad assortment of Nikon D4S, DF, D610 and D810? By combining the good properties of the Nikon D610 with those of the D810 and adding WiFi and a fold-out screen?
Good plan.
Shall we call it a Nikon D750? Then you know immediately that it's more than a successor of the Nikon D700, already popular for years due to its high image quality.
Outstanding plan.

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Review Nikon D4S

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The newest Nikon flagship for photojournalists is the Nikon D4S. It's the top camera from Nikon, which really has everything. It's an improved version of the D4, which has been around for years. No completely new body, but an "upgrade": more ISO, more images per second and even better auto focus. Professional cameras are much more robust than amateur cameras. They're built in relatively small series according to the highest specifications. That explains why the D4S is the most expensive Nikon SLR. We investigated how the image quality of the Nikon D4S compares to that of other Nikon cameras. NikonD4s
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Review Nikon D810

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The Nikon D810 is successor of the D800 and the Nikon D800E. It's a full-frame top model, with a new 36-megapixel sensor in strong body. The Nikon D810, just like the 800E, has no optical low-pass filter and is thus fully focused on achieving the highest image quality. Will the Nikon D810 capture first place from the D800E on the basis of image quality in our list of reviews? The Sony A7 R didn't manage to do that. Do the differences in processor and sensor result in measurable differences that are visible in practice? We comprehensively review the three models next to each other, with a qualitatively very high-value lens (Nikon 85 mm f/1,4).

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Review Nikon D3300

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The Nikon D3300 is the new entry-level model for fans of an SLR. It follows the D3200. The image format is APS-C, and the sensor has no fewer than 24 megapixels. It looks exactly like the sensor of the Nikon D5300. In contrast to the D5300, the Nikon D3300 has no fold-out or swiveling screen, making the D3300 less expensive. A lot of capabilities, outstanding performance at high ISOs... but is the camera really that different from its predecessor?

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Review Nikon J3 (Nikon 1); small and fast

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The Nikon J3 is one of the smallest cameras in the world with an interchangeable lens. The compactness of the body is due to the relatively small sensor (ca 13 x 9 mm). Nikon calls this the CX format. The AF is at least as fast as a DSLR, and this also applies to the image quality. If you do not have to resort to the highest ISO settings, the image quality is very good.

Despite the small size, there is still a fold-out flash. There is no accessory shoe for, say, a push-up-GPS, and also no built-in Wi-Fi. The J3 (which used the same sensor as the Nikon 1 V2) excels with a fast AF, an extremely short shutter lag, a very fast shutter (1/16,000 second) and a high continuous speed at 60 frames per second.

It works best on the automated settings.

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Review Nikon D610

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A little over a year ago, the Nikon D600, Nikon's smallest and lightest digital SLR camera with a 24-megapixel FX sensor, was billed as a game-changer: a compact, full-frame camera with a modest price tag ("Full frame for all"). Stories appeared on internet about the shutter of the Nikon D600 failing due to oil or dust on the sensor. Roger Cicala of LensRentals described the phenomenon in his blog, and noted that it decreased/disappeared over time. However, Nikon chose to err on the side of caution and decided to quickly release a successor to the Nikon D600, with another shutter, to the market. Would this be the game-changer?
The target audience for this camera consists of advanced amateur photographers who demand a compact, lightweight, affordable (with a suggested retail price below the 2,000 euros), with – thanks to the large FX sensor – professional image quality.

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Review Nikon V2 (Nikon 1)

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The Nikon 1 V2 is the successor to the V1. This is more than a cosmetic upgrade: the V2 has a built-in flash, is therefore a bit bigger and now seems like a DSLR in pocket size. The sensor has a higher resolution with 14 megapixels. The specifications of the Nikon V2 give up nothing to many SLRs. The operation is, just like the design, comfortably classic, with a PSAM-disk on top, and two rotating disks for the controls. An ideal stepping-stone camera for those who want more than a compact camera, but mind the weight and dimensions of an SLR camera.

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