The best lens for....Canon camera's

Lens advice
Starters

Starters

Lens advice
Amateurs

Amateurs

Lens advice
Full-frame Amateurs

Full-frame Amateurs

Canon 10-18 vs 10-22

0
0
0
s2smodern

Is the Canon 10-18 mm better than the Canon 10-22 mm?

1018vs1022Recently, we published our Canon 10-18 mm review. That's a very inexpensive wide-angle zoom lens, which is in our opinion at least as good as the much more expensive Canon EF-S 10-22 mm that we already reviewed.

Is that really so? Where does the price difference between the two Canon EF-S wide-angle zooms come from? Is there a catch?

 

 

A wide angle is......... photographing with pleasure

1022Canon EF-S 10-22mm @ 13mm f/8, 1/250 sec, 1600 ISO

Many photographers start with an SLR camera, including a 18-55 mm kit lens. After a while, they want to draw in their subjects more, and a telephoto zoom comes along, while a wide-angle zoom lens might be a better choice. With a wide-angle lens you're forced to creep in closer to your subject, so you get more interaction between photographer and subject. A wide-angle lens is also a much better way to get a sweeping overview. Or to get the entire building in the picture, instead of just half.

The main argument for choosing a wide angle, as far as I'm concerned, had to do with a creative consideration. Tastes differ, but I find shots made with a wide angle to be usually more original, more striking and more impressive-looking than shots taken with a telephoto lens. A possible reason why starters at first look in the direction of a telephoto zoom is the acquisition price. For under 300 euros, you can buy different telephoto zooms, but not a wide-angle zoom. The Canon 10-18 mm changes that.

10-18mm vs 10-22mm: External differences

The first thing that stands out when you put the Canon 10-18 mm and the 10-22 mm next to each other is that the 10-22 is longer (9 cm vs 7.5 cm) and heavier (240 us 385 grams).

With a filter diameter of 77 mm, the 10-22 mm seen from the front is considerably more impressive than the 10-18 mm with a filter size of 67 mm. More glass costs more money, and a bigger filter as well. You see that in your wallet. Whether you see it in the image quality is the question.

The Canon 10-22 mm is, thanks to all that extra glass, almost 1 stop faster: from f/3.5 at 10 mm to f/4.5 at 22 mm. The aperture of the Canon 10-18 mm runs from f/4.5 at 10 mm to f/5.6 at 18 mm.

Sizecompared

Tip: On Camerasize.com you can compare the size of lenses on your camera. Here you can see the Canon 10-18 mm, Canon 10-22 mm and the Canon 18-55 STM on a Canon 650D. The 10-18 mm is as compact as the 18-55 mm STM kit lens.

With a faster lens, you have less trouble with motion blur, the viewfinder of the SLR is brighter, and you can play more with depth of field. That argument doesn't work with a wide-angle lens: there, the depth of field is so great that the higher brightness of the 10-22 mm does not lead to a more beautiful background blur compared to the 10-18 mm.

1022detailImageStabilizer

 Difference in finish. The more expensive Canon 10-22 mm is equipped with a window with a distance indicator; the 10-18 mm doesn't. A silver or a black ring with the focal length is a matter of taste.

A higher brightness can justify a price difference of 200 to 300 euros, because it's much harder to make a sharp bright lens than a less bright lens that's equally sharp. The Canon 50 mm f/1.8, for example, costs less than a hundred euros, while the Canon 50 mm f/1.4 costs a bit over three hundred euros. For a Canon 70-200 mm f/4 you pay just about half of what you put down for a Canon 70-200 mm f/2.8 (around 1,100 euros without image stabilization).

Image stabilization: major plus point for Canon 10-18 mm

Canon has in recent months released a number of zoom lenses (16-35 mm f/4 and 24-70 mm f/4), which is 1 stop less bright than the top model (16-35 mm f/2.8 and 24-70 mm f/2.8 MK2), but unlike the top model are equipped with image stabilization. Because you win 3 stops with image stabilization, you can use the less expensive models with image stabilization longer in the dark to get shots without motion blur than with the 1 stop faster top models—as long as the subject is not moving.

The same is true when comparing the 10-18 mm and the 10-22 mm. The built-in image stabilization of the 10-18 mm ensures that you can keep shooting in the dark longer than with the more expensive, slightly faster 10-22 mm.

That built-in image stabilization does not have to be expensive is proven by the Canon EF-S 18-55 mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM, which is for sale for less than a hundred euros. It's possible that a 10-18 mm without built-in image stabilization would be 50 euros less expensive. Or a Canon 10-22 mm with built-in image stabilization—in theory—fifty more expensive.

 PortretCanon EF-S 10-22mm @ 22mm f/7.1, 1/100 sec, 400 ISO

Disadvantage of a premier: research costs money

You can compare the design of a new lens compare to developing a new drug. The research that it takes costs a lot of time and money. And that research money is refunded by the first customers. The Canon EF-S 10-22 mm was the first EF-S wide-angle zoom that was marketed at that time by Canon, with a much wider angle than any other Canon lenses. When Canon began with the development of the 10-18 mm, they could build on the knowledge and experience that was gained from the 10-22 mm and the latest STM lenses. Maybe this is a major cause of the spectacularly low price of Canon 10-18 mm.

It's not yet clear, because the Canon 24-70 mm f/2.8 MK2 is, for example, more recent and yet noticeably more expensive than the Canon 24-70 mm f/2.8.

HierRust Canon EF-S 10-22mm @ 10mm f/5, 1/60 sec, 400 ISO

Canon 10-22 vs 10-18: Image quality

CA1018If you're looking at image quality, see our Canon 10-18 mm review and Canon 10-22 mm review; then you'll see that the 10-18 mm gives nothing up on any point to the 10-22 mm. In terms of sharpness, they're neck and neck. the 10-18mm in our test shows a more uniform sharpness when you compare it with the 10-22mm.  The 10-22mm shows slightly higher center sharpness than the 10-18mm. Because it is more difficult to make a sharp fast lens, the 10-22mm eventually scores slightly higher for resolution. Below we will show several 100% crop sample images.

Because during our review there was no lens correction profile available for the 10-18 mm, but there was for the Canon 10-22 mm, it seems at first—if you compare the WYSIWYG scores—as if the Canon 10-22 mm suffers less from chromatic aberration or vignetting. The WYSIWYG score for chromatic aberration, which is based on jpg files in which all available corrections are applied, is better for the 10-22 mm, but as soon as a lens profile correction for the 10-18 mm is available, after an update to the Canon software, these differences will disappear. If you look at the scores for RAW files, where no corrections are applied, then the differences between the lenses are not significant. Vignetting, chromatic aberration and distortion are also easy to correct in Lightroom or Photoshop.

In some practice shots, the chromatic aberration in uncorrected RAW files from the 10-22 mm was higher than from the 10-18 mm, as you can see in the following image.

CA1022

10-18mm vs 10-22mm: comparison of sharpness

Even shown at 100%, the difference in sharpness between the two lenses is difficult for some to see, but it is visible to the naked eye. Normally you never compare so directly. The 10-22mm in our test showed a higher center sharpness and the 10-18mm more uniform sharpness from center to corner. A fair comparison is if you set the 10-22mm at the same aperture as the 10-18mm. Then the sharpness of the corner 10-22mm is closer in the neighborhood of 10-18mm.

1018vs1022overview10mm

Click here for a comparison of the center sharpness withe the apertures wide open (f/4 for the 10-22mm and f/5 for the 1-0-18mm). Move your mouse over the image above for a comparison of the corner sharpness.

1018vs1022overview14mm

Click here for a comparison of the center sharpness with the apertures wide open. Move your mouse over the image above for a comparison of the corner sharpness. To sum up, you can say that the image quality of the 10-18 mm is equal to, if not better than, the image quality of the 10-22 mm. Many photographers attach greater importance to a uniform sharpness from center to corner. Then, the 10-18mm performs even better than the 10-22mm.

Inexpensive wide angle is........... a joy to work with

How important is the difference in zoom range? The difference in focal length between 18 mm and 22 mm is much smaller than the difference between a 10 mm or 12 mm lens. The 10-18 mm also works perfectly with the zoom range of the 18-55 mm kit lens. And if I look at the EXIF information of the many shots that I made with the 10-22 mm on holiday, then it seems that I used this lens by far the most at 10 mm.

It sounds strange, but the difference in minimum distance of 22 cm (10-18 mm) or 24 cm (10-22 mm) does make a visible difference. At a focal length of 10 mm, a picture taken at 22 cm distance delivers a surprising perspective. I do have to include the side note there that you will probably make few shots at this distance.

Q MG 9371Canon EF-S 10-18mm @ 10mm f/8, 1/30 sec, 3200 ISO

"What 's it gonna be boy, 'Yes or no?'"
Paradise by the dashboard light, Meatloaf

Should you buy a Canon 10-18 mm?
The answer is a resounding: Yes.

We started with the question of whether there was a catch, with the price difference between the Canon 10-22 mm and the Canon 10-18 mm. The answer is no. There are a few arguments for the higher price of the 10-22 mm. But in terms of image quality, the 10-18 mm is at least as good as the 10-22 mm, if not better. The built-in image stabilization of the 10-18 mm allows for more sharp images in low light, and the STM AF motor of 10-18 mm, for silent video shots. It's a nice bonus that the 10-18 mm is also more compact and lighter than the 10-22 mm.

If I found a 10-22 mm for the same price as a 10-18 mm, new or used, I would still buy the Canon 10-18 mm.

Ivo Freriks
Author: Ivo Freriks
With Camera Review Stuff I hope to make a modest contribution to the pleasure that you get from photography. By testing cameras and lenses in the same way, evluating the results and weighing up the pros and cons, I hope to help you find the right camera or lens.

0
0
0
s2smodern

Comments (50)

  1. Yusof

Thanks a lot for the info because I'm about to purchase a 10-18 but distracted by second hand 10-22 which is still slightly more expensive tha a new 10-18.

 
  1. Bob    Yusof

Hi Yusof,<br /><br />Thanks for your comment.<br />We hope you'll enjoy the Canon 10-18mm<br /><br />Regards<br /><br />Bob

 
  1. Chris

Exactly the comparison I was needing. Thanks!

 
  1. IvoIvo

Thanks for letting us know, Chris.<br />And enjoy your Canon EF-S 10-18mm!<br /><br />Ivo

 
  1. Jim Liu

:-) This is a very good comparision between the two lenses. Thanks for the good work.

 
  1. Plisca

I really appreciate the time you put into this article! I was about to buy a 10-22.

 
  1. Ivo    Plisca

Hi PLisca,<br /><br />Thanks for the feedback. We wish you a lot of fun with the Canon 10-18mm.<br /><br />Ivo

 
  1. John

I would like to ask if you would buy a second hand 10-22 if the price is 3.2% cheaper than the 10-18 brand new?

 
  1. Ivo    John

I would go for the new one.<br />Being 100% shure that your lens never fell or got any other damage for 3.2% is a bargain price.<br /><br />Ivo

 
  1. John    Ivo

I would go for the new one.<br />Being 100% shure that your lens never fell or got any other damage for 3.2% is a bargain price.<br /><br />Ivo
<br />Thank you so much Ivo, you've cleared up everything for me. I'll buy 10-18 this 30th of November...

I would go for the new one.<br />Being 100% shure that your lens never fell or got any other damage for 3.2% is a bargain price.<br /><br />Ivo
<br />Thank you so much Ivo, you've cleared up everything for me. I'll buy 10-18 this 30th of November as an early Christmas gift for myself.

Read More
 
  1. Elena

I was going to get 10-22, when I realised that I might have 10-18 with image stabilisation – and for much better price. So I started looking for comparison – and your article helped me a lot. Going to get my 10-18 soon

 
  1. Ivo

Hi Elena,<br />Thanks for your comment.<br />I am sure you will enjoy the Canon 10-18mm.<br /><br />Regards,<br /><br />Ivo

 
  1. Lars Mortensen

Okay, this review was great and really convinced me! Is there a 67mm filter you would recommend? BR Lars

 
  1. Ivo Freriks    Lars Mortensen

Hi Lars,<br /><br />I didn't test filters of different brands with our Imatest set-up, yet.<br />And I am quite picky what filters are concerned. <br /><br />That's why I would choose Hoya HD, in any filter size. <br />These filters have a very...

Hi Lars,<br /><br />I didn't test filters of different brands with our Imatest set-up, yet.<br />And I am quite picky what filters are concerned. <br /><br />That's why I would choose Hoya HD, in any filter size. <br />These filters have a very high transmission (especially nice for fast lenses, but perhaps less important for the 10-18mm), a special coating against water and grease (always fine), and also very important since many photographers buy filters to protect their lenses, much harder than normal filter glass.<br /><br />The price of a Hoya HD Filter Protector 67 mm shouldn't be a large obstacle.<br /><br />Surely there will be other interesting filters around, and Hoya offers even cheaper filters, but I didn't have time for a serious filter comparison.<br /><br />I'll put in on my To-Do list.<br /><br />Ivo

Read More
 
  1. Lars Mortensen    Ivo Freriks

Thanks, that was helpful!<br />BR Lars

 
  1. Lars Mortensen    Ivo Freriks

Hi again, so now I'm finally buying! Just to be sure, since there seems to be many different filters: Is it Hoya HD UV 67mm? I mean is it automatically also a UV filter?

 
  1. cosmin

I'm in the same ball park:<br />sh 10-22 v. new 10-18 <br />however, I'm not entirely sure if I'm good with the latter choice.<br /><br />Is there any way i can find infinity in night time conditions on the 10-18 ? (thinkin' wide milky way shots...

I'm in the same ball park:<br />sh 10-22 v. new 10-18 <br />however, I'm not entirely sure if I'm good with the latter choice.<br /><br />Is there any way i can find infinity in night time conditions on the 10-18 ? (thinkin' wide milky way shots ) <br />does the new lens look sturdy enough to withstand some mountain use or some fast pj use in friendlier environemnts ( switching lenses fast / not using lens caps etc.) ? <br /><br />I happen to be running two ancient bodies - a 30d and a 40d and I don't really have the budget to upgrade but i really need a decent wide angle (the obvious choice, I guess would be a nicely calibrated second hand tokina 11-16 but I can't seem to get my hands on one - have used one from a friend for two weeks and I was hooked but he will note part with it)<br /><br />thanks!

Read More
 
  1. Ivo    cosmin

Thinkin' Milky Way shots, many before you chose a Tokina 11-16mm.<br />Either search harder or pay more, and you'll be happy ever since.<br /><br />Regards,<br /><br />Ivo

 
Load More

Leave your comments

Posting comment as a guest.
Attachments (0 / 3)
Share Your Location