How do I spot dirt/dust on the sensor?

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s2smodern

With system cameras with interchangeable lenses, it is unavoidable that the sensor will get dirty—whether that is dust from the environment, oil from moving parts (like the mirror in an SLR camera), fibers from a cleaning brush/cloth or an unintentional fingerprint. It happens to us all, although you do not see it on every picture. Even if you never change lenses, there is a chance of the sensor getting dirty. A small number of the—generally more expensive—cameras and lenses are extra-well sealed against dust. Even that is no guarantee that no dust will reach the sensor. Dust is everywhere. If you use a zoom lens that changes length when zooming in and out, then you also suck new air—and thus dust—into the camera. The question is thus not whether your sensor will get dirty, but when your sensor will get so dirty that you will start to see it.
How do you recognize dust and other dirt on a camera sensor? Someone who wants to buy a second-hand camera should certainly know the answer to this question. How do you clean a sensor, and how do you prevent it from getting dirty again?

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s2smodern

How to calculate DOF, hyperfocal distance

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s2smodern

 

In order to make a picture such that 15 cm tall kingfisher just fits in the camera's longest dimension, you will need - besides patience and some luck - the right equipment: 

  • a camera with a full frame sensor and a 1200 mm telephoto lens
  • a camera with an aps-C sensor and an 800 mm telephoto lens
  • a micro-43 camera and a 600 mm telephoto lens


Cambridge in Colour
offers several calculation modules which help you answering questions like:

  • Which focal point do I need at a given camera and distance to a subject, to fit that subject  in the camera's longest dimension?
  • How large is the depth of field at a given camera, lens, aperture and focussing distance?
  • At which aperture setting starts sharpness to diminish because of diffraction?
Ijsvogel
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s2smodern

How do I use a macro lens?

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s2smodern

It is unusual to choose a macro lens as the first addition to a standard kit lens. And yet, it is a logical choice. Not only because macro photography is very popular, but also because a macro lens can be used well as a portrait lens. Each and every camera brand and lens brand produces at least two macro lenses. How do you make the right choice then if you know that the focal length and the set aperture of the macro lens greatly determine the final image? And to complicate things, the size of the image sensor too is iconic. In this article, I will show on the basis of practice pictures what macro lens is a good choice. Sigma-50-mm-macro-review

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s2smodern

How do I choose a lens?

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s2smodern
Very often the following question is asked: "I like photographing my (grand) children and nature, and I just have a kit lens. What should be my next lens?" How do you answer that question considering that the big brands Canon and Nikon together offer about 100 different lenses? To still answer a part of the question, I focus on three aspects that are important when choosing an additional lens. These are optic angle, perspective and depth of field. Because the purchase price and the weight of the lens have nothing to do with the image, I omit them. Nikon-18-300-mm-product
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s2smodern