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Review Canon EF 16-35mm F2.8L III USM

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A bright 16-35mm zoom is a lens that many documentary photographers cannot do without. The Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM was introduced in 2016 simultaneously with the Canon 5D mk4. The large field of view and the high brightness ensure that you can still get your subject in frame well in small or busy spaces and in poor lighting. The time that documentary photographers were satisfied with less sharp corners is over, however. High requirements are also set for these kinds of documentary zooms today. To respond to that, Canon has released a third version of this popular lens.

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Review Canon EF-S 18-135 mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM

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Canon has released a new EF-S 18-135 mm lens (version 3) for their APS-C bodies, the EF-S 18-135 mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM. It is the kit lens for the EOS 80D camera, because many photographers find the larger 7x zoom range more interesting than the zoom range of the Canon 18-55 STM IS kit lens. The AF system makes use of a combination of a new ring USM motor and a stepper motor. This provides extra-fast sharpening. The Canon 18-135 mm USM is quieter than the Canon 18-55 mm STM. The lens also has built-in image stabilization good for about 4 stops. We tried the set for ourselves and were impressed. Especially the large zoom range (28-216 mm in 35-mm equivalent) is very handy in practice. You pay a price for that: the brightness is sufficient, but no more than that. All in all, a fine, all-around documentary lens. Thanks to the new Nano USM AF motor, that’s true for both video and photography.

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Review Canon 50 mm f/1.8 STM on 760D

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To buy a bright portrait- or concert-photography lens, you have to dig deep. With a Canon APS-C SLR like the Canon 1200D or the Canon 760D, that isn’t needed. The Canon 50 mm f/1.8 STM is bright, compact and inexpensive. That the STM motor provides terrific, constant AF during video is a greaet bonus. Because the Canon 50 mm f/1.8 STM is designed for cameras with a 24 x 36 mm image surface (the lens design dates from 25 years ago), you only use the best part of the lens (the center of the image) with Canon amateur cameras. Less weight, compact dimensions, a low price and better image quality are added plusses. Sounds good, right?

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Review Canon 50 mm f/1.8 STM @ 5Ds

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With the arrival of the Canon EF 50 mm f/1.8 STM, we met the successor to a legendary lens, which was introduced a full 25 years ago. The Canon 50 mm f/1.8 II is a popular, affordable, bright lens that serves perfectly on a camera with a full-frame sensor as a universal standard lens that can also be used in low light for all possible subjects. But since the introduction of digital cameras, there have been a great many innovations in the design of lenses. A sensor thus reflects a part of the light, while that was not the case with analog film. Lenses that are designed for digital cameras thus get extra coatings in order to ensure that any internal reflections do not decrease the contrast or create disruptive ghosts. For video, smooth and silent AF is important. And digital cameras make higher demands in terms of resolution than analog cameras do. Those were all aspects on which the Canon 50 mm f/1.8 II was beaten by 50 mm lenses from other brands. To what degree will the Canon 50 mm f/1.8 STM change that?

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Review Canon 24 mm f/2.8 STM

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The Canon 24 mm EF-S STM lens is an all-round wide-angle lens, 38 mm in full-frame equivalent. It is not especially bright (f/2.8). The big advantage lies in its unusually compact and light design. The lens is just 22 mm deep. The stepper motor for the auto focus has replaced the usual USM motor, in order to ensure supple and practically noiseless focusing while filming. Does that really work? And what are the other properties like? We tested everything out on a Canon 760D body.

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Review Canon 24 mm 1.4L II @ 5D MK3

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The Canon 24 mm f/1.4 L II was introduced at the end of 2008. In the digital photography era, that seems like ages ago. But this is still one of Canon's fastest wide-angle lenses with a fixed focal length. Such lenses can be used for available-light photography and are to be found in the bags of many professional photojournalists and landscape photographers. According to Canon, the image quality of the 24 mm 1.4 L II is improved in comparison with its predecessor, thanks to two exceptionally accurate aspherical lenses, which correct aberrations, image curvature and distortion.

Canon24

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Review Canon 24 mm 1.4L II @ 650D

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If you, as a professional/prosumer Canon photographer with an APS-C camera (Canon 7D MK2, 70D) want a bright AF lens with a fixed focal length around 35 mm, then you almost cannot do without the Canon 24 mm f/1.4 L II—which was introduced at the end of 2008. In the digital photography age, 2008 seems like centuries ago. Even so, there are still, aside from the Sigma 24 f/1.4 Art, which is not currently available, few alternatives with an equivalent brightness. The optically and construction-wise phenomenal Sigma 18-35 mm f/1.8 Art comes close as far as brightness is concerned, but it is also longer and heavier. In addition, it is not a lens with a fixed focal length. And there are many photographers who prefer a fixed focal length.

Canon24

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Review Canon 16-35 mm f/4 @ APS-C

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The Canon 16-35 mm f/4 has been for sale since June 2014, with a list price of € 1099. It is Canon's first ultra-wide angle lens in the L series with optical Image Stabilizer (IS) and, according to the specifications, has a 4-stop advantage over lenses without IS. The Canon 16-35 mm f/4 IS is designed for use on a camera with a full-frame sensor, such as the Canon 6D. Are you considering purchasing a camera with a full-frame sensor at some point but for now are satisfied with your Canon APS-C camera? Then when purchasing a new lens, also look at the performance of the Canon 16-35 mm f/4 IS on a Canon 650D:

Ef-16-35-mm-f4L-IS-USM-

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Review Canon 16-35mm f/4 @ FF

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Rather a Canon 16-35 mm f/4 IS than a 16-35 mm f/2.8 II?

Ef-16-35-mm-f4L-IS-USM-

A comparison of the new Canon 16-35 mm f/4 IS with the Canon 16-35 mm f/2.8 II that we reviewed previously is obvious. The list price of the Canon 16-35 mm f/4 (1100 euros) is 600 euros more, and the built-in image stabilization – a premier for the Canon L wide-angle lenses – offers more profit than the 1-stop difference in brightness between the two zooms. In terms of dimensions, they're pretty evenly matched.
Both lenses will be flexibly used for landscape and architectural photography. There, you general don't need to worry about a fast-moving subject, and the Canon 16-35 mm f/4 IS has the advantage if it's about making sharp images for you. But is this new Canon L zoom lens even sharper?

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Canon 10-18 vs 10-22

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Is the Canon 10-18 mm better than the Canon 10-22 mm?

1018vs1022Recently, we published our Canon 10-18 mm review. That's a very inexpensive wide-angle zoom lens, which is in our opinion at least as good as the much more expensive Canon EF-S 10-22 mm that we already reviewed.

Is that really so? Where does the price difference between the two Canon EF-S wide-angle zooms come from? Is there a catch?

 

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Review Canon 70-200mm f/2.8 mk2

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The 70-200 mm f/2.8 is probably the most used telephoto zoom amongst professional photographers. This time, we reviewed the Canon EF 70-200 mm f/2.8L IS II USM, a top-end/professional lens for full-frame cameras, on a Canon 5D mark II.

This type of zoom lens is especially popular among professional photographers, especially among photojournalists, due to the useful zoom range and because at full aperture you have so much background blur that you can easily separate a subject from the background, but also because the lens is relatively easy to carry, and that thanks to the image stabilization you can shoot really well by hand. The Canon telephotos are creamy white and thus quite recognizable: officially because the lenses then remain cooler in the sun, but in reality a superb marketing gimmick!

Canon 70-200 mm objectief

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Review Canon 10-18 mm

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Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM delivers a high image quality.

Do you already have a wide angle lens? Precisely for novice photographers, a cheap wide-angle zoom, like the Canon 10-18 mm, is interesting. With a wide-angle lens, you bring drama into your photos. You offer viewers an impression that is impossible for you with a standard lens. Almost certainly, you get enthusiastic responses to wide-angle shots.

Canon EF-S 10-18mm review

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Review Canon 50mm 1.2L @ Canon 650D

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A Canon 50 mm f/1.2 lens is not the most obvious choice of lens to use on a camera with an APS-C sensor. Even so, we are routinely asked how well a Canon EF lens performs on a camera with an APS-C sensor. And for every bokeh enthusiast, the extremely high brightness of this high-quality L-lens provides the ability to isolate your subject from the background, without having to switch to a camera with a full-frame sensor. Further, this test is interesting as a future 'benchmark' for the other Canon 50 mm lenses, which we haven't yet tested as of this writing. Thus, when during our test of the Canon 50 mm f/1.2 on a Canon 5D MK3 we had a Canon 50 mm f/1.2L available, we also made measurement tests with our Canon 650D.

Canon 50mm 1.2 test op Canon 650D

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Review Canon 50mm 1.2L

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There's no such thing as coincidence. A CameraStuffReview reader offered me the opportunity to test a Canon 50 mm f/1.2. Such a thing almost never happens. It's a very unusual lens that is very difficult to make, and due to the high purchase price, you rarely encounter this lens. This time, I was extra-pleased with the offer, because I was just wanting to test the Sigma 50 mm f/1.4. Now I was able to test them at the same time.

Before we come to the young challenger, let's review the old champion. The Canon 50 mm f/1.2L USM has the largest aperture of all Canon lenses that are currently available.

Canon50mm

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Review Canon 24-70 mm f/4 IS (C APS-C)

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Canon EF 24-70 mm f/4 l IS USM: a surprising new model in Canon's advanced L-series.

Surprising, because the zoom range and the largest aperture is similar to the popular Canon 24-105 mm f/4 IS USM. The optical system includes two aspherical elements and two UD (Ultra low Dispersion) lenses. A fluorine coating on the front and rear minimizes the amount of dirt, dust and fingerprints – and contributes to a superior picture quality and reduces the need for cleaning. The new macro function enables you to take pictures with a maximum magnification of 0.7 x – so you do not need to take a special macro lens. We previously reviewed the Canon 24-70 mm f/4 on a Canon 5D MK3, but how does it perform on a camera with an APS-C sensor such as a Canon 7D, Canon 70D or as in our case a Canon 650D?

EF-24-70mm-f4L-IS-USM-FRA

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