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Review Panasonic 45-200mm f/4-5.6 II

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The Panasonic Lumix G Vario 45-200mm f/4.0-5.6 II Power O.I.S. is the update to the old, familiar 45-200mm. It is a telephoto zoom lens with a big range and modest dimensions. The new version is improved on many small points, although the optical design is unchanged, and this zoom lens now works optimally with Panasonic’s newest cameras.

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Review Panasonic Leica 12mm f/1.4

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Professional photographers with an Olympus or Panasonic camera have waited painfully for a bright, dust- and splashwater-tight wide-angle lens. For the Panasonic Leica 12mm f/1.4, that is. Micro-43 cameras and lenses are attractive for those who aim for high image quality and simultaneously want to keep the size and weight of the camera equipment limited. In comparison with full-frame cameras, the focal depth with micro-43 is, however, larger, so that you cannot play as much with background blur. That is particularly a stumbling point for advanced photographers who make deliberate use of background blur with micro-43 lenses, with a maximum aperture starting at f/2.8. The Panasonic Leica series offers dust- and splashwater-tight lenses, that are so bright that you can create a nice bokeh with them. To what extent does the Panasonic Leica 12mm f/1.4 differ from the Panasonic Leica 15mm f/1.7 and the Olympus 12mm f/2?

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Review Panasonic 12-60 mm

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Panasonic has again succeeded in making attractively priced kit lenses with good image quality for their G-series cameras. I first think about the professional Panasonic 12-35 mm f/2.8. The Panasonic 14-140 mm, with its fast and quiet AF, is also nearly indispensable for amateur photographers and videographers who do not want to change lenses, or as little as possible. And the inexpensive and super-compact Panasonic 12-32 mm is an absolute must for starters and amateurs. These zoom lenses are sold as a kit in combination with Panasonic cameras and in that case offer a great deal more value for the money. All three of these kit lenses are equipped with built-in image stabilization, and they offer high image quality for the price. “What else could you wish for in new micro-43 lenses?” you might think.
How about an inexpensive kit lens with a broader zoom range (a field of view that corresponds with 24-120 mm on full-frame) that is extra-well sealed against dust and splashwater? Such a lens was not yet available for micro-43 cameras.
The Panasonic Lumix 12-60 mm f/3.5-5.6 ASPH POWER OIS has it all. With that, the lens selection for micro-43 cameras is practically just as complete (although I’m still missing a tilt-shift) as the lens selection for SLR cameras.

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Review Panasonic 100-400 mm

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The Panasonic Leica 100-400 offers what Leica cannot offer

The Panasonic LUMIX G 100-400 mm LEICA DG VARIO-ELMAR telephoto zoom lens is probably a sensation that many photographers dream about. With a list price of 1699 euros, it will remain a dream for some. But that price is also an indication of the high quality that we can expect. The designation LEICA DG VARIO-ELMAR indicates that this lens meets high quality requirements. Even so, this is not a copy of a Leica lens, since a similar Leica lens does not exist. This is a lens developed by Panasonic and built in Japan—with the collaboration of designers from Leica. A zoom range of 200-800 mm (equivalent for a 35 mm camera) is exceptional. Combine that with a light (less than 1 kilo!), compact, dust- and splashwater-tight lens body with built-in image stabilization, and you can’t believe your ears. If the image quality also competes with that of much more expensive lenses, then you’ll fall off your chair. 

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Review Panasonic 42.5 mm f/1.7

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What does the Panasonic 42.5 mm f/1.7 portrait lens have to offer? The Panasonic 42.5 mm f/1.2 Noctilux is brighter, has the same focal distance and is, where build and image quality are concerned, perhaps the best micro-43 lens of today. But it is also the most expensive. If you are searching for a less expensive alternative for making great portraits, with which you can also isolate the subject from the background, then you'll do well with the much less expensive Olympus 45 mm f/1.8, which offers an exceptional level of quality for its relatively low price. What does the Panasonic 42.5 mm f/1.7 have that those other two do not?

PanasonicLumix42mm

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Review Panasonic 30 mm macro

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The Panasonic Lumix G Macro 30 mm f/2.8 Asph Mega O.I.S. is designed for macrophotography with a Micro Four-Thirds (Olympus or Panasonic) camera. The minimal focal distance is just 10.5 cm, and that delivers a scale/enlargement factor of 1:1. The image on the micro-43 sensor is then the same size as the original. That is perhaps even more macro than you expect, since a scale of 1:1 on a micro-43 camera corresponds in terms of field of view ("what you see in the picture") with the field of view from a 60 mm macro lens on a camera with a full-format sensor.

LUMIX G H HS030 Slanted

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Review Panasonic 45mm f/2.8 Leica DG MACRO-ELMARIT

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Many new lenses with revolutionary, modern lens designs appear—and with clearly higher image quality, as it appears from our tests. There are so many great lenses coming out that we unfortunately have to make choices about what we will and will not review. But what do you do when so many requests keep coming in from readers for a review of a lens from 2009? Do you keep trying to keep up with the current releases? Then you know for sure that you will never succeed. Or do you take your readers seriously? We chose the latter. All those requests made us curious as well. How good is the Panasonic 45 mm f/2.8 Leica macro Elmarit? Can this PanaLeica handle all the new lenses? Is this high-end macro still worth its price?

Panasonic45mmMacro

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Review Panasonic 25 mm f/1.4 ASPH Leica DG SUMMILUX

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Why isn't there a review of the Panasonic 25 mm f/1.4 on CameraStuffReview? Can you tell us something about the Panasonic 25 mm f/1.4 vs. Olympus 25 mm f/1.8? Those are questions from our readers that we get with some regularity. The answer is simple: We're reviewing like madmen to keep up with all the great lenses that are currently being released. And yet the curiosity keeps nagging at us. That's why when we got an offer from a reader to review his lens, I was all for it, and I got to work.

Panasonic 25mm review

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Review Panasonic LUMIX 35-100 mm F4.0-5.6

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The Panasonic 35-100 mm f/4 - 5.6 is offered with the Panasonic GM5 on PhotoKina in 2014. The field of view of this lens—or: what you see on the photo—is 34 to 12 degrees. That corresponds with the field of view of a 70-200 mm zoom lens on a camera with a full-frame sensor. Just like Canon and Nikon have released a more attractively priced, more compact and lighter f/4 variant of their 70-200 mm lens, Panasonic has now produced an attractively priced, ultra-compact f/4 version of this universal telephoto zoom.

LUMIX35100SilverSlanted

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Review Panasonic 15mm f/1.7 ASPH Leica DG SUMMILUX

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The Panasonic 15 mm f/1.7 ASPH Leica DG SUMMILUX is a micro-43 lens that distinguishes itself from previous Panasonic lenses with more than just its name.
Design and build quality make it clear that this Lumix lens bears the name Summilux for a reason. With a list price of 599 euros, this is currently an expensive Panasonic lens – the famous Panasonic 20 mm 1.7 pancake is 200 euros cheaper – and an inexpensive Leica.
The aperture ring and the AF/MF switch on the lens betray the target audience: the enthusiastic amateur photographer. Would the Panasonic 15 mm 1.7 also distinguish itself in terms of image quality from the other micro-43 lenses?

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Review Panasonic 42.5 mm Nocticron: Hallelujah!

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At the beginning of January 2014, Panasonic announced the LEICA DG NOCTICRON 42.5mm/F1.2 ASPH. /POWER O.I.S. (H-NS043), telephoto lens with a fixed focal length, built-in image stabilization (OIS) and autofocus. Only the extremely high brightness makes this lens unique for a micro-43 lens. In addition, this lens got from Leica the name NOCTICRON. That this lens has AF capability means that the Panasonic 42.5 mm Nocticron knows no equal. The question of course is, how good is this lens optically? How does the image quality stand up to the image quality of a bright lens on a camera with a full-frame sensor? In March 2014, we got the opportunity to try that out.

Nocticron test

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Review Panasonic 14-42 mm f/3.5-5.6 II (m43)

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If you buy one of the cheaper Panasonic G system cameras, then chances are you bought a Panasonic 14-42 mm II kit lens with it. The price difference between camera and camera + kit lens is so small that it's almost a sin not to take the offer. Kit lenses offer great value for the money. We previously tested the predecessor of this lens, as well as its alternatives like the Panasonic 14-42 mm PZ and Panasonic 12-32 mm. But we hadn't gotten to the Panasonic 12-42 mm II. The Panasonic 14-42 mm II is a beautiful, well-built, very light and compact lens with built-in MEGA O.I.S. (Optical Image Stabilizer). How does the performance of this kit lens hold up to the kit lenses you get when you buy an SLR?

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Review Panasonic 20 mm 1.7 II (Micro 43)

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DMC-GX7CEG-K frontFrom our test of the first version of the Panasonic 20 mm 1.7, released with the start of the micro-43 system in 2009, this appeared to be a surprisingly small and optically very good lens. Still, a while ago there appeared a second version of this venerable lens, which we have now tested. Are there differences between the two versions?The Panasonic 20 mm 1.7 II is in conjunction with a Panasonic GM1 almost as small as a compact camera. We tested the Panasonic 20 mm II on a Panasonic GX7. If you use the electronic shutter, then the Panasonic GX7 at full aperture is a completely silent rangefinder camera. At a smaller aperture, you can hear a tiny click when you take a picture.
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Review Panasonic 12-32mm (m43)

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The Panasonic 12-32 mm lens is a super light and spectacularly compact lens with a Micro Four Thirds (MFT) mount. In 35 mm-equivalent (mm @ FF) the range is 24-64 mm, so a standard zoom with true wide angle. And that is special. Wide-angle zoom lenses with this mount are still rare, and the compact dimensions make the lens extra attractive. That is why this is a welcome addition to the MFT offerings.

The brightness is comparable to the previously released 14-42 mm kit lenses from Panasonic. The largest lens aperture is f/3.5 in wide angle and f/5.6 in the telephoto position. With this lens, a mirrorless system camera almost becomes a compact camera, since this lens is so small. Can such a small lens be just as good as a standard zoom?               

H FS12032k front slant

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