Review: Sigma 40mm f/1.4 DG HSM ART

The Sigma 40 mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art is a new Sigma lens with a rather unusual focal length of 40 mm. This makes it on 35mm a standard lens that tends toward the slightly wide-angle. It is a lens in the Art series and therefore, according to Sigma, it must meet the highest requirements in terms of image quality. The use of this lens as a cinema lens has also been taken into account. The Sigma 40 mm f/1.4 DG HSM is a lens for the demanding photographer and videographer.

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Review Sigma 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary @APS-C

The Sigma 100-400 mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary is a light and very competitively priced 100-400 mm telephoto zoom for SLR cameras from Canon and Nikon. With the right adapters, it can also be used on the mirrorless cameras from these brands and, with the Sigma MC11 converter, even on Sony's. On APS-C cameras, this lens has a range that corresponds to that of a 150-600mm on 35mm. And that is seriously super telephoto. Despite the low price, this lens delivers serious image quality. 

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Review Sigma 60-600mm f/4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports

At Photokina 2018, Sigma introduced a new all-round telephoto zoom: the SIGMA 60-600mm F4.5-6.3 DG OS HSM. Telephoto zooms that go up to 600mm have been around for some time, but none of them starts at 60mm. With this 10x zoom range, this is perhaps the only telephoto zoom you need.

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Review Sigma 105mm f/1.4 Art

A lens design for a 105mm f/1.4 lens with 17 lens elements, incorporating 2 elements of FLD glass and 2 of SLD glass, in 12 groups. A weight above one and a half kilos and a filter size of 105 mm. It is clear that the birth of the Sigma 105 mm f/1.4 Art has been an ambitious project. But when you come home with your first practice shots, you realize that this project has been successful. The Sigma 105 mm f/1.4 Art is an extremely high-quality lens that lets you to create sharp images with a fantastically beautiful bokeh. Lateral and longitudinal chromatic aberration (color defects), distortion and vignetting are all so beautifully limited that you continue to look fascinated at that enormously sharpness in that very narrow area that is sharp at full aperture.

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Review Sigma 70mm f/2.8 Macro Art

The Sigma 70 mm EX DG Macro f/2.8, a macro lens legendary for its image quality and modest AF speed, is no more. Shame! Or not? In 2018, Sigma released the Sigma 70mm Macro f/2.8 Art. At 515 grams, the weight of the 70mm Art Macro is almost identical to that of its predecessor. Even so, this is not a simple upgrade of the same lens design in a modern jacket. Sigma has actually raised the bar even higher, while the old 70mm macro stood higher in our list of reviews than almost all more modern - and usually much more expensive - lenses that we have tested since 2012 for a field of view corresponding to 70mm on a camera with a full-frame sensor.

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Review Sigma 85mm f/1.4 Art

The Sigma 85 mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art is a sublime portrait lens. The sharpness is exceptional, and the bokeh is fantastic. And that's not only at full aperture, but also after stopping down one or two stops. In comparison with the few lenses that are qualitatively somewhat close to this Art lens, it's also relatively cheap. If you're looking for the ultimate lens for portraits, then this Sigma 85 mm f/1.4 Art certainly deserves your attention.

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Review Sigma 16mm f/1.4 Contemporary

The Sigma 16mm 1.4 DC DN Contemporary is a bright documentary lens with a fixed focal length, available in Sony E and micro-43 mount, specially designed for cameras with a Sony APS-C or a micro-43 sensor. This lens, introduced in 2017, is a first, because it's the first Sigma lens for micro-43 released in the new Art, Contemporary or Sports series.

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Review Sigma 24-70 mm f/2.8 Art

VERSATILE, ARTISTIC WORKHORSE: Sigma 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS HSM Art

A 24 to 70mm zoom is the standard lens for many photographers. With a range from big wide-angle to a bit of telephoto, you can use this lens for many different types of photography. Especially since it has a high brightness of f/2.8. Then a lens like that is good for almost everything, from landscapes and interiors in the wide-angle position to (travel) documentary, weddings and portraits in telephoto. For many photographers, the 24-70 mm f/2.8 hardly ever comes off the camera. High-quality 24-70 mm lenses with a brightness of f/2.8, however, also carry a stiff price. That's why many photographers were looking forward to the arrival of the Sigma 24-70 mm F2.8 in the Art series. The Art lenses combine high image quality with a generally very reasonable price.

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Review Sigma 35mm f/1.4 Art on Sony A7R mk2

Why would you use a lens with an adapter, instead of a lens with a Sony mount? Because you can get fantastic shots with lenses on a good converter! In our test with the Sigma MC-11 converter on a Sony A7R II, the Sigma 35mm f/1.4 Art achieved the highest scores of all 125 lenses (with a field of view that corresponds with that of a 30 to 40mm lens on a camera with a full-frame sensor) that we have reviewed.

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Review Sigma 14mm f/1.8 Art + MC11 @ Sony A7R mk2

The Sigma 14mm F1.8 DG HSM Art is not only the world-record holder with f/1.8 for 14mm on full frame, Sigma also proudly reports that this dust- and splashwater-tight lens is suitable for future sensors with more than 50 megapixels. The lens is available with a Sigma, Canon or Nikon mount. We tested the Sigma MC-11 on a Sony FE camera (Sony A7R II).

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Review Sigma 20mm f/1.4 Art op Sony A7R mk2

After Sigma broke world records for the world’s brightest zoom lens with the Sigma 24-35mm f/2 (for cameras with APS-C / DX sensors) and the Sigma 24-35mm f/2 (for cameras with a full-frame/FX sensor), now it is the turn of a Sigma lens with a fixed focal length to break a world record: the world’s first 20mm f/1.4 ultra-wide angle lens for cameras with a full-frame sensor. This is a fantastically bright lens, which offers sensational new creative possibilities. If, with a wide-angle lens with a focal length of 24mm, or even less as in this case, on a camera with a full-frame sensor, you want to play with background blur/bokeh, then you need a bright lens. A very bright lens. The focal depth even at f/2.8 is already very big when you are using a lens with a 20mm focal length. The choice between bokeh and focal depth, coupled with an extremely bright wide-angle lens, makes this new world record holder attractive, perhaps even a must, for many photographers.

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Review Sigma 50-100mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art

In theory, a lens with a fixed focal length is better than a zoom lens. With a zoom range of 1—so a fixed focal length—you need to make fewer compromises in the design of a lens than for the design of a zoom lens. A good zoom lens is also more difficult to build because the lens design consists of more lens elements and parts. Even so, there are a few zoom lenses that are so good that in practice they are just as good as the very best lenses with a fixed focal length. In theory, they should be beaten by fixed focal length lenses, but that is not seen even on the very best cameras in practice shots. More to the point: There are a great many lenses with a fixed focal length that deliver a poorer image quality than the very best zoom lenses.

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Review Sigma 24-35 mm f/2 DG HSM Art with Nikon D7200

Is the Sigma 24-35 mm f/2 Art an alternative for the Sigma 18-35 mm f/1.8 Art? The Sigma 18-35 mm f/1.8 (the world’s first zoom lens for cameras with an APS-C/DX sensor with a sensational brightness of f/1.8) is the most obvious if you want to have a high-quality, bright zoom lens for a camera with an APS-C sensor. At every focal length, the Sigma 18-35 mm f/2.8 was just as good as—or even better than—a lens with a fixed focal length and the same brightness. But if you are ever planning to switch to a camera with a larger sensor, then the new Sigma 24-35 mm f/2 might be a better choice. Even if you have to give up some field of view for it.

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Review Sigma 20 mm f/1,4 Art

Focus to 7 meters’ distance at 20 mm. At f/1.8, the focal depth is from 3.5 meters to infinity. At f/1.4, the focal depth is “only” 28 meters (from 4 to 32 meters). That makes a difference in the bokeh

After Sigma broke records for the world’s brightest zoom lens with the Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 Art (for cameras with APS-C/DX sensors) and the Sigma 24-35mm f/2 (for cameras with a full-frame/FX sensor), it is now the turn of a Sigma lens with a fixed focal length to break world records: the world’s first 20 mm f/1.4 ultra-wide-angle lens for cameras with a full-frame sensor. This is a fantastically bright lens that offers sensational new creative options. If you want, on a camera with a full-frame sensor, to be able to play with the background blur/bokeh using a wide-angle lens with a focal length of 24 mm, or in this case even less, then you need a very bright lens. A very bright lens. The focal depth even at f/2.8 is already really big if you use a lens with a 20 mm focal length. The choice between bokeh and focal depth, linked to an extremely bright wide-angle lens, makes this new world-record holder attractive to many people. Perhaps a “must.”

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Review Sigma 24-35 mm f/2 DG HSM Art

With the introduction of Sigma 24-35 mm f/2 Art (“3 bright lenses in one”: 24 mm, 28 mm and 35 mm), Sigma repeats the feat that they previously accomplished with the Sigma 18-35 mm f/1.8 (“the world’s first f/18 zoom lens for cameras with an APS-C/DX sensor”). At every focal length, the Sigma 18-35 mm f/2.8 was just as good as—or even better than—a lens with a fixed focal length and the same brightness. That was unparalleled. A zoom lens with not only the brightness of a fixed focal length, but also the image quality of a fixed focal length. After which many owners of a camera with a full-frame sensor at that time sighed, When will Sigma release a similar lens for us? Now.

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Review Sigma 24 mm 1.4 Art @ 5D MK3

With the introduction of the Sigma 24 mm 1.4 Art, Sigma indicated that this was a lens with the highest optical performance in its class—the perfect lens for all kinds of subjects, from landscape to a starry night sky. Given the high quality of the previous bright Sigma Art fixed-focal point lenses (Sigma 35 mm f/1.4 Art and Sigma 50 mm 1.4 Art), coupled with a clearly attractive price tag (a suggested retail price under a thousand euros), the expectations are high.
Would Sigma succeed in meeting them?

Sigma24mmArt

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Review Sigma 150-600 mm C @ 650D

The Sigma 150-600 mm Contemporary is an affordable telephoto zoom for amateur photographers. As far as zoom range and brightness are concerned, the Sigma 150-600 mm Contemporary gives nothing up to the more heavily built Sigma 150-600 mm Sports, which we reviewed previously. The Sigma 150-600 mm Contemporary will be delivered with a Canon, Sigma or Nikon mount. Right now, the Sigma 150-600 mm Contemporary is only available with the Canon mount. We previously reviewed the Sigma 150-600 mm Contemporary on a Canon 5D MK3 (full-frame sensor) and now on a Canon 650D (with an APS-C sensor). And the large group of owners of a Canon with an APS-C sensor (Canon 7D MK2, Canon 70D, Canon 760D, etc.) have a really great combination if they choose the Sigma 150-60mm Contemporary.  

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Review Sigma 150-600 mm Contemporary

Just like the Tamron 150-600 mm, the Sigma 150-600 mm Contemporary is a telephoto zoom for amateur photographers. They are high-quality, extreme telephoto zoom lenses with a list price just above a thousand euros. As far as zoom range and brightness are concerned, the Sigma 150-600 mm Contemporary gives nothing up to the more heavily built Sigma 150-600 mm Sports, which we reviewed previously.
The Sigma 150-600 mm Contemporary will be delivered with a Canon, Sigma or Nikon mount. For now, the Sigma 150-600 mm Contemporary is only available with the Canon mount. We tested the Sigma 150-600 mm Contemporary on a Canon 5D MK3 (full-format sensor) and on a Canon 650D (APS-C sensor; review appears in a few weeks).

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Review Sigma 24 mm 1.4 Art @ 650D

A few weeks ago, we published a Sigma 24 mm 1.4 Art vs Canon 24 mm f/1.4L II practice test. We then tried out both lenses on a camera with a full-format sensor (Canon 5D MK3) and on a camera with a smaller APS-C sensor (Canon 650D). We noted that Sigma with the 24 mm f/1.4 Art has again delivered a work of art. After we were previously surprised by the extremely good build and image quality of the Sigma 35 mm f/1.4 Art and the Sigma 18-35 mm f/1.8 Art, this was no longer a bolt of lightning out of the blue to us. But it remains a remarkable performance.
We are soon publishing a test of the Sigma 24 mm f/1.4 Art on a Canon 5D MK3, but we first want to put up a defense for the quality-conscious photographer who has a camera with an APS-C sensor. Equipped with a good lens, a camera with an APS-C sensor (Canon 70D or Canon 7D MK2) at a focal distance of 24 mm (38 mm full-format equivalent) delivers pictures with a higher image quality than practically all lenses (fixed and zoom) at a focal distance of 35 or 40 mm on a camera with a full-format sensor.

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Review Sigma 150-600 mm Sports @ 5D MK3

It's time to celebrate, because the Sigma Sports series finally consists of two telephoto zooms: next to the Sigma 120-300 mm f/2.8 Sports—which did very well in our review—you can, as a sports or nature photographer, now also choose the Sigma 150-600 mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sports. To make the party complete, Sigma has also released the associated teleconverters, with which—while retaining AF—you can bring subjects even closer, if a 600 mm focal length is not enough for you. Both Sigma Sports zoom lenses distinguish themselves from the current Art lenses because the Sports lenses have built-in image stabilization and because the AF for the Sports lenses is even more customizable with the optional USB dock and the Custom switch on the Sigma 150-600 mm Sports.

150600mmmini

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